San Antonio named a top spot for college grads

The Alamo City has made the list once again — this time, as one of the top 10 cities for post-college life.

Livability.com, a national Web site featuring information on what it calls America’s 500 best places to live — has included San Antonio on its top 10 list of cities for college graduates.

In choosing which cities would make the grade, Livability.com looked at such factors as job opportunities, salaries, population age and night life and cultural scenes.

This college-grad list if one of several featured on livability.com’s Web site. The site also breaks down the country’s top 10 staycation cities, the 10 great hiking trails and the best unexpected beer cities — to name a few.

The one thing all of these lists have in common is Livability.com’s focus on highlighting what it calls the “places in between the big cities.” Major metros like New York City, Chicago or San Francisco are not livability.com’s area of interest.

Livability.com listed job opportunities in manufacturing and service professions, a thriving downtown scene, a large young adult population and great Mexican restaurants as pluses for the Alamo City.

Livability.com also included some vital statistics on each of the cities — including median household income, $54,818 for San Antonio; the percentage of white collar and blue collar jobs, 76 percent and 24 percent, respectively; and the percentage of the population with bachelor’s degrees and master’s degrees, 15 percent and 10 percent, respectively. …

The Alamo City has made the list once again — this time, as one of the top 10 cities for post-college life.

Livability.com, a national Web site featuring information on what it calls America’s 500 best places to live — has included San Antonio on its top 10 list of cities for college graduates.

In choosing which cities would make the grade, Livability.com looked at such factors as job opportunities, salaries, population age and night life and cultural scenes.

This college-grad list if one of several featured on livability.com’s Web site. The site also breaks down the country’s top 10 staycation cities, the 10 great hiking trails and the best unexpected beer cities — to name a few.

The one thing all of these lists have in common is Livability.com’s focus on highlighting what it calls the “places in between the big cities.” Major metros like New York City, Chicago or San Francisco are not livability.com’s area of interest.

Livability.com listed job opportunities in manufacturing and service professions, a thriving downtown scene, a large young adult population and great Mexican restaurants as pluses for the Alamo City.

Livability.com also included some vital statistics on each of the cities — including median household income, $54,818 for San Antonio; the percentage of white collar and blue collar jobs, 76 percent and 24 percent, respectively; and the percentage of the population with bachelor’s degrees and master’s degrees, 15 percent and 10 percent, respectively.

Joining San Antonio on Livability.com’s list were Nashville; Provo, Utah; Tucson; Charlotte; Kansas City, Mo.; Lincoln, Neb.; San Jose, Calif.; and fellow Texas town, Fort Worth.

In terms of median household income, San Antonio’s was higher than several of the other cities on the top 10 list, per Livability.com’s analysis.

San Antonio’s percentage of college graduates, however, is much lower than the other cities on the list. The one exception is Fort Worth, where 9 percent of its population has a master’s degree. The North Texas town, however, still has a higher percentage of residents with a bachelor’s degree — 17 percent to San Antonio’s 15 percent.

The full list is available here.

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On College Campuses, Obama’s Not Cool Anymore

President Obama poll numbers are nearing the levels he enjoyed in 2008, with one glaring exception: young people. Especially young white people. His approval rating is at 56 percent approval rating among people ages 18 to 29. That’s higher than the 51 percent national average, but that’s a decline of 10 points compared to the 2008 exit polls, according to the National Journal’s Ronald Brownstein report. And if you want a look into the reason for the slump in one of the demographic groups that most strongly embraced Obama in 2008, it may be this: Obama’s simply not cool anymore.

The New York Times’ John Vinocur finds ample anecdotes to flesh out that theory at Oberlin College, a campus that prides itself for its brand of hipster left-wing activism. Among Vinocur’s data points: Four undergrad editors at The Oberlin Review signed an essay lamenting that most students had opted out of agitating, unlike alums who protested slavery and the Vietnam war.

A symposium last month called “Oberlin-based Perspectives on the Obama Presidency” noted that students don’t think Obama’s cool anymore–all his cute little quirks have become grating, a polisci professor explained, and the real Obama can’t live up to their idea of him.

Students aren’t even impressed that Osama bin Laden was killed, protesting that the world’s most wanted terrorist was unarmed when he was shot.

Read more here.

Terrelle Pryor exiting OSU amid scandal

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Terrelle Pryor‘s career at Ohio State, which started with so much promise and potential, came to an abrupt and scandal-ridden end.

The Ohio State quarterback announced through his attorney Tuesday that he would not play for the Buckeyes this season. He had already been suspended for the first five games for breaking NCAA rules by accepting improper benefits from the owner of a tattoo parlor.

“In the best interests of my teammates, I’ve made the decision to forgo my senior year of football at The Ohio State University,” Pryor said in a statement issued by Columbus lawyer Larry James.

James said entering the next NFL supplemental draft is Pryor’s “desire.” But James acknowledged labor uncertainty could lead to consideration of the Canadian Football League or working with a personal quarterback coach first.

James said Pryor told him of the decision within the hour and that Pryor said it was “in the best interest of my teammates.”

The Cleveland Plain Dealer first reported Pryor’s announcement.

The NCAA is looking into all aspects of Ohio State’s once-glittering program, from cash and tattoos to players, cars deals for athletes and other potential violations.

READ MORE ON ESPN.COM